Want new wheels and am concerned about offset.

Spiderwolf

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picking up my 2023 Raptor in the next few days. I’ve got the beadlock wheels and just think they are ugly. I want a flashier wheel, but keep the 17 inch, 37 inch tires thats on it. So from what I understand, this wheel has a +34 offset. There are not any 17 inch wheels I can find that I like that has that kind of offset. I’m looking at a few Fuel wheels and one has no offset, one a 20 inch offset and another has a 24 offset. I’m pretty picky about wheels, and there just is nothing else. I dont want to have to buy new tires as well by going to an 18 inch or bigger wheel. Didn’t even really look that far yet to see if the bigger wheels have that kind of offset. What will going to a smaller offset do to the geometry of everything and what would it do looks wise. Has anyone else changed the factory wheels and gone to a different offset?
 

littlebeefy

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Did you consider wheel width when calculating offset? If you get wider wheels than the 8.5" you have now you will want the extra width to go to the outside meaning you will use less positive offset. Additionally, it is easy enough to use a spacer if the wheel doesn't have enough positive offset when you're talking about 10-15mm.
 

Dluu12

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I've changed the wheels (17X9) with 0 offset so it sticks out a little, just how i like it. I'm on 39x13.5 though. As mentioned by littlebeefy above, the width has to be factor in as well.
 

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Spiderwolf

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I hadn’t considered wheel width because I didn’t know I needed too. The wheels I was looking at I tried to stay close to the stock 8.5 inch rim. I saw a lot of those had 9 inch and larger but thought I had to stay near the original size. I did some reading up on offset but the things I was reading never mentioned wheel width. It’s all confusing to me. I need to talk to someone who can tell me what is the max wheel width I can go to with offset so the look of the stock setup stays about the same. I don’t want tires and wheels hanging out the fender wheels and looking goofy. A chart would be nice. 😃
 

littlebeefy

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Short answer: here is a calculator to compare wheel width and offset https://www.1010tires.com/Tools/Wheel-Offset-Calculator

Long answer: you can do all the math and still end up surprised by the fit. Some manufacturers calculate offset based on wheel centerline and others do it based on tire centerline. That can be a little different with bead locks which have a thick curbside lip. Also, some have more precise measures for backspacing and provide those instead, which retailers may change to offset for advertising purposes. If you want a stock fit EXACTLY, you should just use stock wheels. If you want to use aftermarket wheels, just buy and mount 1 on the front and test the fit and that there is no rubbing before you invest in a full set. It’s probably better to err on the side of a little too much positive offset because you can use spacers to shift the wheel toward the curb. If you don’t have enough positive offset you can’t remedy that. The good news is that we are talking about very small differences and usually only translate to a few millimeters. I defy anyone to look at two trucks side by side and tell me which one has 5mm more tire showing.
 
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Spiderwolf

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Short answer: here is a calculator to compare wheel width and offset https://www.1010tires.com/Tools/Wheel-Offset-Calculator

Long answer: you can do all the math and still end up surprised by the fit. Some manufacturers calculate offset based on wheel centerline and others do it based on tire centerline. That can be a little different with bead locks which have a thick curbside lip. Also, some have more precise measures for backspacing and provide those instead, which retailers may change to offset for advertising purposes. If you want a stock fit EXACTLY, you should just use stock wheels. If you want to use aftermarket wheels, just buy and mount 1 on the front and test the fit and that there is no rubbing before you invest in a full set. It’s probably better to err on the side of a little too much positive offset because you can use spacers to shift the wheel toward the curb. If you don’t have enough positive offset you can’t remedy that. The good news is that we are talking about very small differences and usually only translate to a few millimeters. I defy anyone to look at two trucks side by side and tell me which one has 5mm more tire showing.
 
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Spiderwolf

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Short answer: here is a calculator to compare wheel width and offset https://www.1010tires.com/Tools/Wheel-Offset-Calculator

Long answer: you can do all the math and still end up surprised by the fit. Some manufacturers calculate offset based on wheel centerline and others do it based on tire centerline. That can be a little different with bead locks which have a thick curbside lip. Also, some have more precise measures for backspacing and provide those instead, which retailers may change to offset for advertising purposes. If you want a stock fit EXACTLY, you should just use stock wheels. If you want to use aftermarket wheels, just buy and mount 1 on the front and test the fit and that there is no rubbing before you invest in a full set. It’s probably better to err on the side of a little too much positive offset because you can use spacers to shift the wheel toward the curb. If you don’t have enough positive offset you can’t remedy that. The good news is that we are talking about very small differences and usually only translate to a few millimeters. I defy anyone to look at two trucks side by side and tell me which one has 5mm more tire showing.
After looking up mm to inches, 5 mm is not even a 1/4 of an inch so that makes sense
 

TheButcher

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@Spiderwolf look for 17x9 with 0 offset, or somewhere close to that. You shouldn't have any problems at all if you are keeping the 37" factory tire. We have done several with the Vorsteiner Offroad wheel with both 37s and 39s and they don't rub with stock suspension (on the street anyway). If you do hard offroading the 39" will likely rub. The 37 should be fine.

17x9, +0 with 39s on this one
IMG_8631 copy.jpg
 
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Spiderwolf

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@Spiderwolf look for 17x9 with 0 offset, or somewhere close to that. You shouldn't have any problems at all if you are keeping the 37" factory tire. We have done several with the Vorsteiner Offroad wheel with both 37s and 39s and they don't rub with stock suspension (on the street anyway). If you do hard offroading the 39" will likely rub. The 37 should be fine.

17x9, +0 with 39s on this one
View attachment 2211
 
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Spiderwolf

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That’s almost exactly what I did. I ordered some fuel wheels, 17x9, with a +1 offset. So thanks for the suggestions. Wheels are on their way, and then the beadlocks will ho up for sale.
 

topshelfjeff

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That’s almost exactly what I did. I ordered some fuel wheels, 17x9, with a +1 offset. So thanks for the suggestions. Wheels are on their way, and then the beadlocks will ho up for sale.
i'd be interested in buying your beadlock capable ones
 

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